Talent and Quality - Twighlight Zone

#1
I thought the TV scene playing in the safehouse was amusing. They had Julius begging for a chance to do a TV series, the pilot. This reminds us of how Chase couldn't get the networks to take the Sopranos. HBO picked it up and the rest is history.

Then the Julius character is told that the TV industry wants talent and quality. That is repeated a few times. The final dialogue is that writers are major commodities. I thought that was a shout out to Chase and his co-writers of this series.

The final bit was hearing the Twiglight Zone theme music.....brilliant

Re: Talent and Quality - Twighlight Zone

#2
I'm surprised that no one has picked up on this thread yet, but I guess the discussion is still so focused on the ending that some of the more esoteric details of the episode will have to wait their turn for more thorough discussion.

I couldn't tell if this bit was placed on the television as praise or mockery of the current state of television. If DC feels that present day television is indeed striving for and producing more quality programming, then it must be a method for him to express that the writer is the key for such continued quality and to praise tv execs for having courage to have faith in talented writers turing out quality programs.

If on the other hand he thinks that present day television is bereft of talent and quality (more likely the case given the proliferation of inanity and "reality" programs) then this was a major dig at the industry and one of the more delicious uses of background noise he has undertaken. Either way I loved it's inclusion in the episode.

Re: Talent and Quality - Twighlight Zone

#3
May I respectfully disagree?

I didn't like it. It's another one of these inside jokes or "messages" that seemed to crop up a lot in recent Sopranos episodes. There have been several not-so-veiled references to how much audiences crave blood and gore, too.

Sometimes all of that just gets in the way of telling the story (for me.) I can't remember another show that was so self-conscious about what the audience is saying or not saying, thinking or not thinking.

Re: Talent and Quality - Twighlight Zone

#5
Billymac, I think that "Twilight Zone" snippet served the latter purpose, based on what knowledge we have of Chase's feelings toward television. Chase seems to have nothing but contempt for the state of popular television and movies, and all of modern pop culture in general.
chaseisgod wrote:May I respectfully disagree?

I didn't like it. It's another one of these inside jokes or "messages" that seemed to crop up a lot in recent Sopranos episodes. There have been several not-so-veiled references to how much audiences crave blood and gore, too.

Sometimes all of that just gets in the way of telling the story (for me.) I can't remember another show that was so self-conscious about what the audience is saying or not saying, thinking or not thinking.
I think only in this final episode has the show has been a lot more conscious of what David Chase has to say. In fact, I'd say that the scene directly before the "Twilight Zone" safehouse one also serves as a message from David Chase: AJ's speech about the American Dream vs. the American Reality, in which the reality becomes even more clouded by "jerk-off television fantasies". Of course, I'm sure the speech would be told much more eloquently in Chase's own voice over AJ's (to me it always seems that whenever AJ mounts his philosophical high-horse, he's just trying his best to quote other sources that have fed him his opinion), but I have a feeling that at least a part of what AJ had to say was straight from Chase's own personal views.

I've never personally been taken out of the reality of the story in the wake of such little moments. I also don't think it's only recently that the show has been sprinkled with periodic nods, references, and David Chase messages. This show has always seemed like a very personal creation for Chase, and he's always inserted bits and pieces of himself in the show, as well as bits and pieces of his influences (Goodfellas, The Godfather, etc.). The "Twilight Zone" reference differed from ones in the past, though, in that past television or movie snippets we've been shown seem to have something to say about Tony Soprano. This one's inclusion seems to be for the sole purpose to say something about David Chase. In this case, then, I can see why this moment would take someone out of the story, as was your complaint. In fact, Fly has already gone so far as to call this the most meta episode of the entire series, and already I concur. This doesn't bother me much though, as I find these meta-references subtle enough to leave me entirely invested in the story without dwelling too much on the extra self-conscious statements being made.

Chaseisgod, care to share some examples of these "not-so-veiled references to how much audiences crave blood and gore"? I don't doubt you when you say they are there, but I'm ashamed to say that I don't recall any at the moment.

Re: Talent and Quality - Twighlight Zone

#6
Universal Polymath wrote:Billymac, I think that "Twilight Zone" snippet served the latter purpose, based on what knowledge we have of Chase's feelings toward television. Chase seems to have nothing but contempt for the state of popular television and movies, and all of modern pop culture in general.



I think only in this final episode has the show has been a lot more conscious of what David Chase has to say. In fact, I'd say that the scene directly before the "Twilight Zone" safehouse one also serves as a message from David Chase: AJ's speech about the American Dream vs. the American Reality, in which the reality becomes even more clouded by "jerk-off television fantasies". Of course, I'm sure the speech would be told much more eloquently in Chase's own voice over AJ's (to me it always seems that whenever AJ mounts his philosophical high-horse, he's just trying his best to quote other sources that have fed him his opinion), but I have a feeling that at least a part of what AJ had to say was straight from Chase's own personal views.

I've never personally been taken out of the reality of the story in the wake of such little moments. I also don't think it's only recently that the show has been sprinkled with periodic nods, references, and David Chase messages. This show has always seemed like a very personal creation for Chase, and he's always inserted bits and pieces of himself in the show, as well as bits and pieces of his influences (Goodfellas, The Godfather, etc.). The "Twilight Zone" reference differed from ones in the past, though, in that past television or movie snippets we've been shown seem to have something to say about Tony Soprano. This one's inclusion seems to be for the sole purpose to say something about David Chase. In this case, then, I can see why this moment would take someone out of the story, as was your complaint. In fact, Fly has already gone so far as to call this the most meta episode of the entire series, and already I concur. This doesn't bother me much though, as I find these meta-references subtle enough to leave me entirely invested in the story without dwelling too much on the extra self-conscious statements being made.

Chaseisgod, care to share some examples of these "not-so-veiled references to how much audiences crave blood and gore"? I don't doubt you when you say they are there, but I'm ashamed to say that I don't recall any at the moment.
Off the top of my head:

--At the start of Season 6A, when somebody says there's no accounting for the taste of the American people, and Agent Harris pukes out his car.

--During the pre-screening of Cleaver, when they talk about whether they need to add a little more gore, and the consensus is yes, they do, because that's what today's audiences want.

--The scene when JT Dolan can only get a few bucks for his Emmy. (OK, I laughed at that.....)

--The entire episode "Christoper," which seemed to be done solely to respond to critics' complaints that the show was anti-Italian.

I'm sure there are others. Just can't think of them right now.

The Twilight Zone

#8
Did anyone catch what they were talking about in the Twilight Zone as it played in the safe house. Something about TV shows and writers . . ?

Then the cat comes in as the theme song plays.

Thread merged. Please take note of topics already being discussed before starting new threads. DH.

Re: The Twilight Zone

#9
Guywiththegun wrote:Did anyone catch what they were talking about in the Twilight Zone as it played in the safe house. Something about TV shows and writers . . ?

I'm almost certain I recognized the show playing on TV in the background - just before the Twilight Zone music. It was from a 50s movied titled "The Last Angry Man". It was about a doctor from the Bronx (or something close to that) and his nephew (or similar) who wanted to do a TV special on him showing all the good work he did.

The dialog was something like this, "TV executives today are interested in quality and the writer is the head of that whole process." Then the Twilight Zone music played. If I am correct, the explanation is that there was some time lapse between the time we see the show on the TV and the time the music plays.
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