It’s too late for Tony to leave the Mob (sadly)

#1
It occurred to me that one of the main reasons for including this John Sacramoni storyline (besides giving a great actor his due) was to convey to audience a very important and probably overlooked plot-point.

Johnny Sack smoked cigarettes for over 30 years, abruptly quits – and THEN develops lung cancer. I repeat Johnny Sack, a fellow Boss like Tony Soprano stopped engaging in a pattern of behavior that was inherently self destructive and detrimental to his personal health and well-being and then suffers the repercussions of decades of addiction anyways.

I can’t help but wonder if this was the writer’s way of saying that any chance of reform or hope for Tony will be ultimately futile. That regardless of weather or not he manages to change and give up a “habit” or “pattern of behavior” that is self destructive he will still suffer the consequences of his decades of mafia activity anyway.

Re: It’s too late for Tony to leave the Mob (sadly)

#2
Very interesting thought, Joe. Could be. In that way I wouldn't say it's "too late" for him to leave the mob, only too late to reap any benefits after leaving.

But I'm less interested in whether Tony lives or dies at series end and much more interested if he finally finds his "inner Finnerty". While at the door of death, he knew (from the lawsuit filed against Finnerty) that his life as a changed man would be frought with accusations, guilt, vendettas, and other difficulties. But when he refuses to give up the Finnerty briefcase at the moment of truth, the moment where he must choose his true identity, he is turning his back on Tony B, his mother, and all those who know him and invite him to die as Tony Soprano. The family reunion he chooses is the one in his hospital room, a fulfillment of the "Finnerty Family Reunion" forecast on the invitation in that briefcase.

I want most to see him embrace that identity, whether he dies the day after or 30 years after.
Tony, his spirits crushed after b-lining to the fridge first thing in the morning: "Who ate the last piece of cake?"

Re: It’s too late for Tony to leave the Mob (sadly)

#4
stulongisland wrote:Funny that family reunion mentioned, didn't Phil Leotardo have a family reunion / birthday party ? would that be a family reunion? any significance? comparing family reunions ?


stulongisland wrote:Funny that family reunion mentioned, didn't Phil Leotardo have a family reunion / birthday party ? would that be a family reunion? any significance? comparing family reunions ?


I'll bite.

Tony's "reunion" was a present moment occurrence that brought him out of a coma and possible a foreshadowing of a change of heart about who he is as a person. He reverted to his old self in latter parts of 6a but in 6b it's apparent that the shooting and the NDE has had an effect on him.

Phil continues to come across as more insecure then Tony(At least on the surface and that's were it matters most in this world). His family name from the old country is a source of embarrassment for him. His constant need to remind people of Billy. His chance at a full grasp of power where ultimately cut short by a heart attack, after killing his cousins gay husband. He wears his heart on his sleeve in front of almost everyone, which will be his downfall. Nobody in a position of power can do that. Much less a Mafia boss. Phil is going to make some crazy moves and probably really hurt Tony but it's not gonna work out for him in the end. Phil will end up dead one way or another.

Re: It’s too late for Tony to leave the Mob (sadly)

#5
I've recently been teaching my students about the Spiritual Exercises of Saint Ignatius Loyola, founder of the Jeusits.

It occured to me that Tony Soprano is an amzing subject to use as a working example of someone who is madly desirous of the fruits of the Spiritual Exercises: namely, wholeness, happiness, ordered values, union with God.

Now I know that at first glance these things do not quite seem to match what Tony "really" seems to want, but so many episodes have proven otherwise--notably most of 6A and the first two of 6B.

Of particular interest is Carmine's dream--bringing to his father a box filled with happiness. Don't think for a minute that Tony's unconscious (avenue to the soul) is not going to process that in episodes to come.

He's coming out.

Transformation awaits and will abound...

Re: It’s too late for Tony to leave the Mob (sadly)

#6
Rugbyjake, your post just gave me goosebumps. I hope you are correct. His moral/spiritual journey is what has most driven my obsession with the series, really forever, but especially since late season 4 when we got exposition of the first real signs that Tony wanted a different life.

I, for one, do not at all find any surprise or irony in your observation that he is a man in spiritual crisis who would make for an excellent study in a theology class.

RJ, check your private messages if you haven't already as there's something relevant in there. I would love to hear more about your teaching and theological studies, perhaps in the Satriale's Meet Market or even in the Kitchen Sink if you'd like to relate them in the context of a discussion about Tony and the spiritual undercurrents in the show.
Tony, his spirits crushed after b-lining to the fridge first thing in the morning: "Who ate the last piece of cake?"

Re: It’s too late for Tony to leave the Mob (sadly)

#7
This terror angle is a perfect way for Tony to get out of the life. Maybe a deal is presented involving the Arabs at the Bing.

You can tell hat Tony has begun to strule with his ultimate doom
-His talk with Bobby on the boat "either dead or in the can"
-The look on his face when he hears about Johnny Sac (dead and in the can)
-The irritated and jelous look on his face when little Carmine talks abut being happy about not being boss.

The thought of an OC-free life is certainly starting to creep it's way into the big guys head.
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