Tony B. (alone) at welcome home party...

#1
I have been out of the country, and unable to see Episode Three. This issue may by this time seem irrelevant and may have been addressed. However, in my absence, I have been preoccupied by the scene in which we see Tony B. alone (albeit momentarily) at the family welcome home party. He has excused himself to say hello to "Uncle Zio." However, we observe see him alone (at service bar, perhaps?) without his frozen party smile. His affect appears wistful, contemplative, and incongruent with the event. I am wondering if we are catching a glimpse of melancholy surrounding his loss of 15 years? Anger regarding his "doing time" for Tony S? The effrontery of Bobby B's son oblivion at not knowing who he is? Is this merely the expression of a formerly institutionalized individual going through the stress of re-entry? Or, are we seeing the machinations of his unfolding plan of revenge?

On another note, I do not think that we are catching glimpses of the character development of Tony B's possible homosexuality. Rather, a potential type of paraphilia, if you will...not as easily understood nor as readily identified as homosexuality.

Will catch up on Episode 3 later...by which time these issues may have been satisfied/more clearly developed.

</p>

Re: Tony B. (alone) at welcome home party...

#3
I think Observing Ego may be referring to speculation offered by several posters (including myself) in this thread, which started with a discussion about the excessive hugging in "Rat Pack":

pub132.ezboard.com/fsopra...=1&stop=20

It's not that there are any outright "signs" that Tony B is gay, and no one I know of at this point would wager that he is. But there were a number of curiosities, for lack of a better word, the confluence of which might suggest that a gay subtext is being developed. Obviously, we will have to wait to know with 100% certainty whether the things mentioned are mere coincidences or the beginning of a subtle revelation that Tony B is gay.

</p>

Tony B. alone at party...

#4
Exactly, Fly. You eloquently state/translate my position in that I am not picking up gayness, per se. Rather, possible subtextual cues of, as you say, the curiosities of "other" sexual leanings.

Now, do you recall the moment I cited earlier in my post regarding the brief time when Tony B. is observed alone at the party. In his affect, we are privy to an intense internal experience. What is your interpretation of his expression...?

</p>

Re: Tony B. alone at party...

#5
Yes, OE, I do know the moment you are talking about.

Several possible explanations come to mind, most of which you touched on. First Tony B may have felt overwhelmed at the pressure of suddenly being out and having to mingle with a lot of people as the star attraction in a big social situation. He strikes me as relatively introspective and quiet, and years in the can probably didn't do a lot to make him particularly gregarious or comfortable with the spotlight.

Also, Meadow had just asked about his missing daughter, which obviously was such a sore spot that he couldn't even offer a reply. Between Kelly's misfortune, hilighted by the contrast with Meadow, the beautiful, successful Ivy Leaguer; Bobby Jr.'s insensitive remark; and his own ex wife's failure to show with his other two children; it just seemed like a heavy dose of "welcome back to the real $hit of life" for Tony B.

I did not pick up any vibe of it being about revenge or even about deep resentment for Tony. More just an unease at the whole situation that he was trying to hide.

</p>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub132.ezboard.com/bsopranolandforum.showUserPublicProfile?gid=flyonmelfiswall>FlyOnMelfisWall</A> at: 3/27/04 12:07 am

Re: Tony B. alone at party...

#6
FlyOnMelfisWall wrote:Yes, OE, I do know the moment you are talking about.

Several possible explanations come to mind, most of which you touched on. First Tony B may have felt overwhelmed at the pressure of suddenly being out and having to mingle with a lot of people as the star attraction in a big social situation. He strikes me as relatively introspective and quiet, and years in the can probably didn't do a lot to make him particularly gregarious or comfortable with the spotlight.

Also, Meadow had just asked about his missing daughter, which obviously was such a sore spot that he couldn't even offer a reply. Between Kelly's misfortune, hilighted by the contrast with Meadow, the beautiful, successful Ivy Leaguer; Bobby Jr.'s insensitive remark; and his own ex wife's failure to show with his other two children; it just seemed like a heavy dose of "welcome back to the real $hit of life" for Tony B.

I did not pick up any vibe of it being about revenge or even about deep resentment for Tony. More just an unease at the whole situation that he was trying to hide.

</p>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub132.ezboard.com/bsopranolandforum.showUserPublicProfile?gid=flyonmelfiswall>FlyOnMelfisWall</A> at: 3/27/04 12:07 am


This seems right. The homecoming scene for Tony B was basically a repetitive pattern - Tony B meets one of his old friends, then is reminded of some depressing fact in that conversation.

Tony S delivers a monologue about himself and Tony B, then kind of goes off on a small tangent about how their other family members have died since then.

Tony B is reunited with Artie Bucco, then learns about the suicide attempt and underlying resentment.

Tony B is reunited with Janice, meets her family, then learns from Bobby Jr. that he's basically been forgotten

Tony B meets Meadow, and she reminds him of Kelly

Basically, he comes home and learns that his life is now shit, and his family and friends are getting old and bitter.
Post Reply

Return to “Episode 5.02: Rat Pack”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest