Re: Indian Saying

#12
I think this refers to the possibility that Tony has a guardian angel (possibly Meadow). Tony does, quite often, pity himself about the burden he carries of looking after his family and the life he leads because of this. However I think its fair to say that he has been extremely lucky over the years since he became boss having a seemingly miraculous ability to escape trouble at the last possible moment as though someone or something is guiding him.

There are two pivotal moments in the series (arguably the two most pivotal moments) when a 'great wind' has been present. One is in Mayham, as Tony hears the wind and then Meadow's voice in the trees, prompting him to 'choose life' as it were. This is clearly important as up until then he had seemingly accepted his fate with very little reluctance.

The other time when ther was a 'great wind' was during the season 1 episode Isabella. I think its fair to say that it was during this episode that Tony was expreincing the worst of his depression. However, Tony is shocked out of his depression due to the attempted hit instigated by Junior. Prior to this the episode goes to great lengths to show how windy it is.

I don't know of any deeper significance to this but it seems clear that the presence of the wind always foreshadows a 'shock' to Tony; be it coming out of severe depression or coming out of a coma.

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Re: Indian Saying

#14
Kev Infinity wrote:I think this refers to the possibility that Tony has a guardian angel (possibly Meadow). Tony does, quite often, pity himself about the burden he carries of looking after his family and the life he leads because of this. However I think its fair to say that he has been extremely lucky over the years since he became boss having a seemingly miraculous ability to escape trouble at the last possible moment as though someone or something is guiding him.

There are two pivotal moments in the series (arguably the two most pivotal moments) when a 'great wind' has been present. One is in Mayham, as Tony hears the wind and then Meadow's voice in the trees, prompting him to 'choose life' as it were. This is clearly important as up until then he had seemingly accepted his fate with very little reluctance.

The other time when ther was a 'great wind' was during the season 1 episode Isabella. I think its fair to say that it was during this episode that Tony was expreincing the worst of his depression. However, Tony is shocked out of his depression due to the attempted hit instigated by Junior. Prior to this the episode goes to great lengths to show how windy it is.

I don't know of any deeper significance to this but it seems clear that the presence of the wind always foreshadows a 'shock' to Tony; be it coming out of severe depression or coming out of a coma.

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I'm probably stating the obvious by saying that the Ojibwa poem basically means that when a person finds himself/herself in a tight spot it is usually just another road to the solution. Another quote by Pres. Andrew Jackson - used in Ocean's Twelve comes into mind: "Every problem is an opportunity in disguise.".

In Tony's case though, the poem takes a more direct albeit metaphysical turn. The winds appearing several times throughout the series, as you correctly state Kev, is the rope (combined with Meadows repeated cries) to the physical world pulling Tony back. In the dream Tony does take pity on himself. He's confused and frustrated, because of the lucidness of his dream. He's fully aware that something is awfully wrong, as he "lives" another man's "life". A hint given to him that his physical life still awaits him.

When Tony reads the poem on the wall later, it becomes the catalyst for his recollection of his coma indused dreams.

The light beacon Tony repeatedly sees in the horizon is another interesting notion. This twilight world between life and death is far greater than the physical world (the reason for which he later decides to try Peyote.. I know its a bit fetched, but during Tony's hallucination the sun pulses like the beacon)

Re: Indian Saying

#15
Kev Infinity mentions something that struck a chord with me.He points out that Tony is shocked out of his depression after surviving the hit on him in the first series.This is exactly like AJ after his car explodes in the leaves.It snaps him out of his depression as well,he's almost euphoric.I am of the opinion that Tony is killed in the finale,without any doubt whatsoever.But I am slowly coming to think that it's possible Carmela and AJ get it as well.Tony himself says it,"three strikes and you're out right?" He survived the hit in series one,the shooting by Junior and gets shot a third time I believe in Holsten's.AJ similarly survives his own suicide attempt,narrowly escapes his exploding car but then is killed in Hostlen's.IMHO.I take it you all know of the anagram?
Paolo Coleandrea Man in members only jacket (the credit at the end of the series) rearranges to read;
A man kills Tony,Carmela,AJ Don become prone.
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