Melfi's Statue

#1
Ever notice behind Melfi on what could be called a window sill there is always a statue. Sometimes it changes spots, sometimes its an entirely different statue. The camera always seems to put in the background as if it was a subconcious messenger. It would be interesting to go back and look at all the different therapy scenes and talk about what the statue was doing during the scene or what kind of statue it is. Please list any incidences you come across and describe the scene as best as you can. If there is already a thread on this, forgive me, but Ive been wondering about this for awhile now.
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Re: Melfi's Statue

#3
In the second David Lavery edited book, Reading the Sopranos there is a long chapter called Aesthetisc and Ammunition (Franco Ricci). The author goes extensively into the subject of the sculptures, perhaps attaching too much meaning to them, considering that it is rally hard to notice them most of the times, not to mention that during the entire series IMO the only sculpture that every got real visual emphasis (meaning its own close-up) was the big lady at the waiting room. Tony looked at it pondering at the beggining of the Pilor, and also at his last meeting with Melfi, and also Carmela got his own look.
You can't have everything- Where would you put it? -Steven Wright

Re: Melfi's Statue

#5
Errr.... nothing.. :D It just gladly states how much each sculptures at certain shots are supposed to reflect either Tony or Melfi, or their conversation.

Still as I said above as it got no real emphasis I always felt that the book is a bit overanalysing it. Compared to the paintings I think the sculptures are not that recognisable.

Just did you recognise that in Toodle F...ing Oo (2.03) There is a legless armless torso behind Melii? I did not... :( In Prosai Livuska (302)it becomes a dancing clown according to the book. I did not see any of this.

But yet, I maybe should rewatch those episodes.:D
You can't have everything- Where would you put it? -Steven Wright

Re: Melfi's Statue

#6
wizdog wrote:Just did you recognise that in Toodle F...ing Oo (2.03) There is a legless armless torso behind Melii? I did not... :( In Prosai Livuska (302)it becomes a dancing clown according to the book. I did not see any of this.

But yet, I maybe should rewatch those episodes.:D


Very interesting, Wizdog! I'll have to flip through that book, one of these days (because yes, while sometimes the show is overanalyzed - Almost everyone here does it - it's still quite fun, for me at least. And besides, how much is too much, exactly?), and I'll have to watch for those during my next series review.

Wizdog, I don't think this is a case of attaching too much significance to something, "considering that it is really hard to notice them most of the times". Imagine if each different statue was given special emphasis or a close-up - That would come across gimmicky and ham-handed, I feel. The trick is to sneak all of these different things into the background without people noticing them the first or second time (or dozenth time, in my case!).

Re: Melfi's Statue

#7
I stumbled across a gruesome picture of Benjamin “Bugsy” Siegel's hit and noticed a statue on the table in front of him that could possibly explain the significance of Melfi's. The statues are very similar and I wonder if Melfi's was a nod to that hit and served as a symbol to Tony's demise. Neither Carmella nor Tony appeared to like this piece of art, and after seeing that pic of Bugsy, I can see why it would unnerve them. It is worth a Google Image search if anyone wants to back me up.

Re: Melfi's Statue

#9
I've now noticed scenes in which more than one statue are on the window sill at the same time but in different places, and also that thereare 2 similar window sills in the office. Various shot angles catch a particular statue, nearly always one at a time. Also, the statues are likely moved on the sills from time to time, perhaps when the room is cleaned, so we occassionally see a statue in a shot that swapped positions with another.
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