Emmy Award submissions

#1
I know most of you think awards are silly and I certainly don't disagree, but I thought some of you might find this interesting.

I've been a fervent Wikipedia editor for some time now; I've written most of The Sopranos article. It's gruelling work at times and there's absolutely no reward but I feel some sort of weird obligation to share my esoteric knowledge in a variety of fields (mostly pop culture and language arts) with the rest of the world.

Anyway, I recently compiled this list of Awards the show received during its run, and while it's still a work in progress it includes the most important awards. Of course, this information is readily available on IMBD but I think this is interesting for one reason: I included the episode submissions for the Emmy Awards. As you probably know, actors submit sample episode for consideration in the acting categories and producers submit a number of episodes for consideration in drama series. These are not officially announced by the Academy for some reason.

The most surprising thing is that James Gandolfini won for "The Happy Wanderer" in 2000, and not for "Funhouse" as most people believe. I don't know why he submitted "The Happy Wanderer" instead of "Funhouse", as the latter is probably one of his finest performances of the show, and I have absolutely no idea how he managed to win.

What do you guys think about the submissions? Could Gandolfini or Falco have won for the fifth season and the second part of the sixth season if they submitted different episodes? Both went with "The Second Coming" in 2007.

Re: Emmy Award submissions

#2
Good to see you posting again, Parps. Interesting stuff.

I guess I don't have too much of an issue with Gandolfini picking Happy Wanderer for season 2 and could easily see why he won for it. The therapy scene in that ep where he confesses to wanting to bash Melfi's face in with a brick until it's hamburger is darkly hilarious and chilling all at the same time, and he plays it brilliantly, first barely repressing his rage at her (and at the world). When he finally tells her what he's really feeling, it's a classic "be careful what you ask for" moment.

Also, the confrontation with Meadow is IMO one of the series' all time great scenes when he passionately defends his right to earn money off of "grown men" who choose to gamble and tells Meadow she can take her high moral ground and sleep in the bus station if she doesn't like it. Of course it's the writing, as usual, the makes for such a powerful foundation, but Gandolfini (as well as Jamie Lynn Sigler) were outstanding in that scene, much as they were in an even more explosive confrontation in No Show.

Season 5 certainly featured many great performances by Gandolfini, including All Due Respect, but to me it should have been a no-brainer for him to submit Unidentified Black Males. That's a tour de force if ever there was one. I can't imagine him ever not winning the Emmy, even without real knowledge of the competition, simply because I know how perfect he was in nearly every second he was onscreen in this series. But I do think it would have been harder for an Emmy voter to pass over him when watching UBM as opposed to Where's Johnny.

I can't really argue with Edie Falco's choice for that season in All Happy Families. That's probably the one I would have chosen for her if it were my decision, with some consideration also for UBM.

As for why she and Gandolfini didn't win that year, there's always the psychological factor at work in voters. They'd both won the past two years consecutively, and I think there's a real desire to "spread the wealth". I also think the Sopranos was so good and so wildly acclaimed and written about and talked about (especially by those with disdain for television as a whole, e.g., Norman Mailer) that it engendered a lot of jealousy and resentment at times within the industry. That could be glimpsed in the letter written by the head of NBC where he was complaining about the unfair advantage the Sopranos enjoyed at HBO because they allowed full bore cursing, violence, and sex.:icon_rolleyes:

Looks like your info for season 6 part 1 is incomplete, so I'll reserve comment there.

For part 2, Second Coming is certainly a defensible choice for both. Gandolfini gets to showcase the extremes in Tony's character, from crying over AJ poolside to curb-stomping a creep who threatened his daughter. Falco got those two brilliant scenes where she is literally shivering with sobs as she reacts to a sedated AJ in the hospital and remembers him as "their happy little boy". Then she calls out Tony for playing the "depression card" and flings the bracelet in his face. So both of them enjoy great range in the episode. Should have been plenty enough to win another Emmy, but . . .
Tony, his spirits crushed after b-lining to the fridge first thing in the morning: "Who ate the last piece of cake?"

Re: Emmy Award submissions

#3
FlyOnMelfisWall wrote:Good to see you posting again, Parps. Interesting stuff.


I've been busy but I still read the forum regularly.

FlyOnMelfisWall wrote:Looks like your info for season 6 part 1 is incomplete, so I'll reserve comment there.


No, it's all there. Neither Gandolfini nor Falco were nominated that year. Which is ridiculous because Falco's performance in "Join the Club" is perhaps her best in the series, tied with "Whitecaps".

Re: Emmy Award submissions

#4
Parps wrote:No, it's all there. Neither Gandolfini nor Falco were nominated that year. Which is ridiculous because Falco's performance in "Join the Club" is perhaps her best in the series, tied with "Whitecaps".


:icon_eek::icon_eek::icon_rolleyes::icon_rolleyes: I don't know what else to say about that.
Tony, his spirits crushed after b-lining to the fridge first thing in the morning: "Who ate the last piece of cake?"

Re: Emmy Award submissions

#5
Yeah that was the most ridiculous thing ever to not even nominate Falco and Gandolfini for their performances in 6A. To me that was an absolute shame.
Another crime was Sally Field and James Spader (!!!!!) winning over Edie Falco and JG. Wow, that was one big joke.
I can only imagine that the reason behind this is what Fly was mentioning about the networks' jealousy and resentments against HBO and their quality and successes (also see the Wire not being nominated during seasons 1-4. I think the show got only one Emmy for writing or editing for season 5).
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