Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#1
When Phil talks to Tony about the Rusty hit at the Confirmation Dinner at Da Giovanni, TOny doesn't admit that he had anything to do with the matter. Phil, after realizing that Tony will not connect hismelf with the hit says "Rusty's gone...we'll chalk it up to the headless horseman."

Is there a connection here between the Rusty Hit and the revenge Phil sought against Tony B?

If I recall correctly, Tony B was always upset that he was referred to, as a kid, as Ichabod Crane when he visited Uncle Pat's farm in Old Kinderhook. Is it too much of a stretch to think that Phil is telling Tony that, while Tony won't admit killing Rusty, Phil knows that he did and that by doing this favor for the NY family, Tony had cleaned the slate with Phil for not letting Phil have the pleasure of Killing Tony B.

I know that Phil is probably not aware of the fact that Tony B was referred to as Ichabod Crane, but the reference once again to "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" seems to connect these 2 events.

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Re: Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#2
Good catch, Billymac. I didn't make that connection at first, but it makes sense. I think Chase enjoys making these type of references, whether as a shout-out to fans like the posters in this forum, or just to keep himself amused. I'm not sure that it has any deeper meaning than the surface connection, but it does call you back to Tony B's death. I don't think all is forgiven on Phil's part though; I think somehow Rusty's death is going be another straw on the camel's back in the tense relationship between NY and NJ. Perhaps the last.

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Re: Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#3
I can't comment on the specifics, b/c I've never seen/read 'The Legend of Sleepy Hollow' and have no idea what its about...

Irregardless, I did get the general drift that Phil was being sincere, and kind of extending an olive branch. When he says 'Maddon, are you a cautious man', he looked like he was impressed, like he approved, like he would be doing the same thing. The admonition seemed to be half kidding, and kind of seemed like the action of an older brother who approved, but was playing his role. The way he wagged his finger suggested that. (lol, OT, but just thinking of when Tony told Melfi that he didn't even let people wag their finger in his face)
Anyway, I'm not suggesting that these two will get on like brothers now, but it did seem like a paternal-esque gesture by Phil. After all, Phil is an old guy, and this was his grandson's confirmation.
When he opened his jacket and said 'my heart is an open book' kinda seemed like extending the olive branch. Maybe not even friendship, but like you suggest billymac, that Phil is saying he's buried the hatched and wants their relations to be amicable. Phil keeps eyeing him though, and seems to be waiting for some sort of acceptance, or any response for a second or two, but Tony keeps it close to his chest. I'm not really sure what to make of that, but Phil's response, again, doesn't seem offended, probably because he approves and would be doing the same thing in Tony's shoes. This part is pretty hard to read.

Anyway, that's the way I saw it... though it was such a poker-face exchange, it could've been the other way.

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Re: Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#4
Wow! I didn't get that all.

In fact I thought it was Phil taking jabs at Tony and letting him not forget that he still hasn't forgotten about Tony B.

Because he never believed for a second that Tony B acted alone and Tony's claim of ignorance of Rusty's hit (even though they BOTH know Tony backed the hit) gives Phil more reason to believe that Tony is responsible for the murder of his younger brother.

Phil is going to be trouble soon.

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Re: Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#6
Yeah his heart being an open book was regarding a wire... I do see Phil always watching to see how T reacts, I assume he is weighing in on whether or not Tony will be a problem for him when he makes his move on J Sac... I don't think it is a coincidence that he uses the Headless Horseman remark, and I too think it show's a little resentment about Tony B's murder.

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Re: Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#7
Interesting topic. I don't know why Phil and Tony's relationship hasn't been discussed as much until now.

It was no coincidence that Phil was present at both Vesuvio's and also this upscale Italian restaraunt, in this episode. These two are pulling at one of Tony's basic obsessions... food. Phil wants to check Tony on all fronts, so he makes sure to socialize at both of these places.

Is Phil positioning Tony to take his side?... he is trying awfully hard, and doing well too (I might add).

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Re: Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#8
the wire idea isnt bad at all, since he was saying at the wedding how Johnny Sac is mighty suspicious now that he had been whining over some rather small stuff and might become a cooperator while Phil himself has been 20 years in the box and hasnt talked.Phil seems to be a strong, clear guy with clear targets, so that would fit.
didnt get that at first, with all that slang etc. and me being not english.

</p>Edited by: <A HREF=http://p098.ezboard.com/bthechaselounge.showUserPublicProfile?gid=hrurusch>Hrurusch</A> at: 4/26/06 9:34 pm

Re: Chalk it up to the "Headless Horseman"

#9
Throughout many of the different threads this season, people have been speculating as to whether or not Tony's "change" will be permanent or whether he will simply revert back to his old ways. Many posts have made reference to the fact that, if Tony is to give up his new frame of mind, something will have to come to a head. In other words, at some point, Tony will find himself at a crossroads that diametrically opposes these two lifestyles. While the situation with Vito and the Rusty hit have caused Tony to engage in some serious introspection, neither of these problems has more directly incorporated the ideals of friendship, family, financial prosperity, masculinity, and morality with which Tony currently is struggling the most to define.

In my opinion, it is becoming more and more obvious that Johnny Sac's days of power in the NY family are numbered. I think Phil's recent outburst at Vesuvio's, while obviously directed primarily at Vito, hinted at his disgust with Johnny and possibly even Tony B as well. It seems that Phil is getting fed up with the current state of affairs in both the NY and NJ families and may even be beginning to feel obligated to step up to restore an "old school" mentality. This fact coupled with his egregious remarks at the wedding reception lead me to believe that eventually Tony will be forced to confront the reality that Phil is going to make a play to take over permanently.

If Tony does remain loyal to Johnny, it could lead to many of the events that have been discussed at length in this forum (ie: deaths in Tony's immediate family, betrayals by Tony's closest associates, Tony's fall from power and possible death, etc.) and could even lead to another Livia/Corrado-esque backstabbing if Johnny were to begin working with the FBI. In this way, Tony will have "done the right thing," but will, in the end, lose the respect and material wealth that the more selfish, hedonistic Tony was afforded.

If Tony opts to ignore sentimentality and decides to abandon Johnny in his time of need, this could surely serve as the impetus for a return to the cold, brutal Tony of old. Of course, many of the storylines mentioned above could still play out and may even play a direct role in his ultimate decision.

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