Carms Father?

#1
I always thought Hugh was the more sensitive of the parents but he didn't seem to be in this episode. I thought it was odd that he let her just lie there and sulk without really saying much just fixing the door then leaving. I guess it has to have something to do with maybe being old fashioned and maybe a little dissappointed that she is not back with Tony, the old timers hold the vow of marriage sacred. I was just wondering what people thought of that scene.

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Re: Carms Father?

#2
<blockquote>Quote:<hr>I guess it has to have something to do with maybe being old fashioned and maybe a little disappointed that she is not back with Tony, the old timers hold the vow of marriage sacred.<hr></blockquote>

His response to Carmela could also be due to the fact that he realizes that Carmela knew the type of man that Tony was before she married him and now after all his transgressions she now wants to separate an fracture her family. His exit spoke volumes about the way he felt. I think the scene was a metaphor in itself (You made your bed now lie in it). I think the look he gave her as he exited the room said exactly that.<img src=http://www.ezboard.com/images/emoticons/devil.gif ALT=":evil">


</p>Edited by: <A HREF=http://pub132.ezboard.com/bsopranolandforum.showUserPublicProfile?gid=twogunsgiancarlo>TWO GUNS GIANCARLO</A>
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at: 4/12/04 9:29 pm

Re: Carms Father?

#3
<blockquote>Quote:<hr>I think the scene was a metaphor in itself (You made your bed now lie in it). I think the look he gave her as he exited the room said exactly that.<hr></blockquote>

That's a brilliant analysis, Two Guns. Thanks for that insight.:-)

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Re: Carms Father?

#5
I loved that scene. I experienced the father as the quiet listener...Carmela's confidante. At the same time, every response posted here makes sense in that (l) he may have been disappointed, (2) he may thought that Carm knew what she was getting into long ago and should have known better, and/or (3) it may have worried him...saddened him to see his daughter in such despair. For me it was a touching, albeit sad scene. We do not see much of him, but when we do, he seems to be a pretty decent guy, no?

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Re: Carms Father?

#6
We've known for a while (since S3E7, "Second Opinion") that Carmela's parents don't really care for Tony and wish she had married someone else. Also (not sure if this has come up in past episodes), we know from the family tree that Carmela's dad has another close relative who's "married to the mob": his sister Lena, who married Joseph Moltisanti (Cousin Dickie's dad, Christopher's grandfather). Perhaps whenever they get around to developing Hugh's character, they'll more fully explore his sadness about his sister and daughter's choice of husbands.

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Re: Carms Father?

#7
<blockquote>Quote:<hr>His response to Carmela could also be due to the fact that he realizes that Carmela knew the type of man that Tony was before she married him and now after all his transgressions she now wants to separate an fracture her family. His exit spoke volumes about the way he felt. I think the scene was a metaphor in itself (You made your bed now lie in it). I think the look he gave her as he exited the room said exactly that.<hr></blockquote>

Ypu nailed it on the head...

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Carm's parents

#8
How about this line:
"You guys get a free ride, I EARN it!"
Carm to her mother about being married to Tony.
Her mother wanted Carm to marry that drug store guy from the beginning but I never remember her father saying anything negative about Tony.

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"You Guys Get a Free Ride"

#9
I think that was the scene where Carmela pointed out that Tony had pulled strings to help her father's construction business. He's complicit, too.

Maybe the man was feeling some guilt because he hadn't shielded his young family from the criminal element -- if he had, Carm might not have seen Tony as husband material.

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Re: Carms Father?

#10
I get the impression that Hugh is quick to forget just who Tony Soprano is, because he loves the guy. He's unable to respond to Carmela because first he has to reconcile Tony's criminal nature to himself. This theory doesn't have too much to support it, except in "Marco Polo" when high class Italian doctor refers to guns as "pieces" and Tony grimly dismisses him, a shadow seems to pass over Hugh, and the next time we see him he's angry-drunk, getting carried to his car.
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