UPDATED 6/26: David Chase on James Gandolfini, including new

#1
He was a genius. Anyone who saw him even in the smallest of his performances knows that. He is one of the greatest actors of this or any time. A great deal of that genius resided in those sad eyes. I remember telling him many times, 'You don't get it. You're like Mozart.' There would be silence at the other end of the phone.

"For [wife] Deborah and [son] Michael and [daughter] Lilliana this is crushing. And it's bad for the rest of the world. He wasn't easy sometimes. But he was my partner, he was my brother in ways I can't explain and never will be able to explain.



http://blog.zap2it.com/pop2it/2013/06/james-gandolfini-dies-david-chases-moving-statement-on-losing-the-sopranos-star.html

Re: David Chase on James Gandolfini's death

#3
So moving.

Leave it to David Chase to write a statement like that to remember his friend.

"He wasn't easy sometimes."

I only heard about his death three hours ago, and I'm already tired of hearing the cliches on CNN about how he was a "gentle giant." James Gandolfini was a Man, M-A-N, like the Bo Diddley song played in the pilot.

Chase said more about him in two paragraphs than anything I've heard/read tonight in the media.
"When my time comes, tell me, will I stand up?"

Re: David Chase on James Gandolfini's death

#4
All indications are that he could be emotionally volatile, as run ins with paparazzi and at least one aggressive (and stupid) "fan" proved and as was suggested by certain onset events. Chase told of how in filming one scene, can't remember which, he got so mad at repeately missing his lines that he finally punched his fist through a glass window. I don't think he was cut badly, but he later apologized to everyone present and to Chase because his rash act could very easily have stalled production for days or weeks while he healed an injury, and he felt bad that his moment of indulgence could have cost hard working crew money.

But he was also described by Edie Falco and others who worked closely with him as an extremely sensitive, compassionate, supportive, generous co-worker and friend with a very palpable soft side. Surely that was in evidence when he gave huge cash gifts to all major cast after the controversial pay raise he negotiated for himself with HBO that threatened the start of production on, I believe, season 4. Chase also said of him, maybe in a Fresh Air interview, something to the effect that there would be no Sopranos without Gandolfini, that there was a depth of humanity and sensitivity in his face and eyes that was really quite extraordinary and that belied his character's externals and description, creating this wellspring of emotional identification by the audience with the character.

I think there's a lot to that in that there was always a vulnerability about the character that for me (except in the wake of Christopher's death) made me willing to forgive him for everything he ever did as long as he was willing to keep trying, however stubbornly and haltingly, to learn more about himself and why he turned out like he did. Half the credit for my own emotional response to the character I give to Chase, maybe slightly more than half, but the other half belongs to Gandolfini.
Tony, his spirits crushed after b-lining to the fridge first thing in the morning: "Who ate the last piece of cake?"

Re: David Chase on James Gandolfini's death

#5
FlyOnMelfisWall wrote:All indications are that he could be emotionally volatile, as run ins with paparazzi and at least one aggressive (and stupid) "fan" proved and as was suggested by certain onset events. Chase told of how in filming one scene, can't remember which, he got so mad at repeately missing his lines that he finally punched his fist through a glass window. I don't think he was cut badly, but he later apologized to everyone present and to Chase because his rash act could very easily have stalled production for days or weeks while he healed an injury, and he felt bad that his moment of indulgence could have cost hard working crew money.

But he was also described by Edie Falco and others who worked closely with him as an extremely sensitive, compassionate, supportive, generous co-worker and friend with a very palpable soft side. Surely that was in evidence when he gave huge cash gifts to all major cast after the controversial pay raise he negotiated for himself with HBO that threatened the start of production on, I believe, season 4. Chase also said of him, maybe in a Fresh Air interview, something to the effect that there would be no Sopranos without Gandolfini, that there was a depth of humanity and sensitivity in his face and eyes that was really quite extraordinary and that belied his character's externals and description, creating this wellspring of emotional identification by the audience with the character.

I think there's a lot to that in that there was always a vulnerability about the character that for me (except in the wake of Christopher's death) made me willing to forgive him for everything he ever did as long as he was willing to keep trying, however stubbornly and haltingly, to learn more about himself and why he turned out like he did. Half the credit for my own emotional response to the character I give to Chase, maybe slightly more than half, but the other half belongs to Gandolfini.


Incredibly well put. Wow.
"When my time comes, tell me, will I stand up?"

Re: David Chase on James Gandolfini's death

#6
FlyOnMelfisWall wrote:All indications are that he could be emotionally volatile, as run ins with paparazzi and at least one aggressive (and stupid) "fan" proved and as was suggested by certain onset events. Chase told of how in filming one scene, can't remember which, he got so mad at repeately missing his lines that he finally punched his fist through a glass window. I don't think he was cut badly, but he later apologized to everyone present and to Chase because his rash act could very easily have stalled production for days or weeks while he healed an injury, and he felt bad that his moment of indulgence could have cost hard working crew money.

But he was also described by Edie Falco and others who worked closely with him as an extremely sensitive, compassionate, supportive, generous co-worker and friend with a very palpable soft side. Surely that was in evidence when he gave huge cash gifts to all major cast after the controversial pay raise he negotiated for himself with HBO that threatened the start of production on, I believe, season 4. Chase also said of him, maybe in a Fresh Air interview, something to the effect that there would be no Sopranos without Gandolfini, that there was a depth of humanity and sensitivity in his face and eyes that was really quite extraordinary and that belied his character's externals and description, creating this wellspring of emotional identification by the audience with the character.

I think there's a lot to that in that there was always a vulnerability about the character that for me (except in the wake of Christopher's death) made me willing to forgive him for everything he ever did as long as he was willing to keep trying, however stubbornly and haltingly, to learn more about himself and why he turned out like he did. Half the credit for my own emotional response to the character I give to Chase, maybe slightly more than half, but the other half belongs to Gandolfini.


Always a way with words. Thank you.

Re: David Chase on James Gandolfini's death

#8
Saddened at the news. No character has ever had such an emotional affect on me a Tony Soprano. It took a great talent to portray that character and make it his own. Ive seen the series about 6 times and was going to wait a year or so before I watched again but I think I might start watching again tonight. RIP James Gandolfini

Re: David Chase on James Gandolfini's death

#9
mutualdream wrote:So moving.

Leave it to David Chase to write a statement like that to remember his friend.

"He wasn't easy sometimes."

I only heard about his death three hours ago, and I'm already tired of hearing the cliches on CNN about how he was a "gentle giant." James Gandolfini was a Man, M-A-N, like the Bo Diddley song played in the pilot.

Chase said more about him in two paragraphs than anything I've heard/read tonight in the media.


Amen. Just as David Chase isn't 'cliche' in his pursuit as an artist, neither are his words on James. I'm devastated but much more so 'numb' to the horrible news. Still isn't sinking in. This is exactly like losing John Lennon! Like many, legendary artistic duos that have worked together to create phenominal Classic stuff - from Lennon/McCartney to Kobe/Shaq - both David and James, though brothers basically, would be at odds in their roles of creating something Classic - this case their placing-into-being the Tony Soprano character who is on no less par than any Shakespearean character nor any other historically heralded fictional character ever conceived of by any artist who ever lived. Same can be said for many Sopranos actors' portrayals of their respective characters. But it all begins with James's portrayal of 'T' - and Edie's of Carm - and without David Chase's conception, there is no Tony Soprano-period. And without Janes and only James portraying him as well as adding plenty more in collabortaion with David, Tony Soprano comes no where NEAR proper, justifiable fruition.

My heart goes out to James's entire family, friends, and other family that being the entire Sopranos cast and crew, and of course all of us true FANS such as myself as well as everyone on this site starting with Fly. We ALL missed out on quite a talent whose Genius would have continued to be shown to us for years and decades to come! Just having seen all 86 episodes, I think since no one episode in particular alone can deliver all justice, I am going to honor his work with the Sopranos in style by running the gammut yet again....

But first, I must see 'Not Fade Away' once more!

Re: UPDATED: David Chase on James Gandolfini's death, includ

#10
New interview with Chase in The Gaurdian. Posted this link after only reading the first couple of paragraphs, but it states exactly the quality of Jim/Tony's lovable magnetism for me, which was that the wounded child in him was nearly always what I saw in his paradoxically hulking, often menacing frame.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/culture/2013/jun/26/james-gandolfini-sopranos-david-chase
Tony, his spirits crushed after b-lining to the fridge first thing in the morning: "Who ate the last piece of cake?"
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