Re: Favorite Quotes from 'The Blue Comet'

#41
Monadax wrote:Did anyone else notice that the guy in the
train shop protecting the kids during the
Bobby whacking looked very much like David
Chase? Was this a Hitchcockian appearance?

Monadax


Watched this episode last night on Free-to-air Australian Network TV, and I thought the same thing myself. Didn't havethe presence of mind to go back and verify it, however.

Re: Favorite Quotes from 'The Blue Comet'

#42
Phil's observation that

Anthony Soprano has no respect for this thing. He's never been in the can, not really. Here's a guy who stepped over his own uncle to grab the big seat, his father's brother.

to me is one of the most important moments in the whole series, because it epitomizes Tony's longstanding battle against Omertá.

By disparaging Tony's attitude towards Junior (and by extension, his own mother), Phil personifies Omertá itself. On the other hand, Tony represents self-understanding and intellectual honesty - or at least the fight for them. I believe Phil's spectacular death in the final episode is meant to signify that:
  • Tony finally succeeded in his six-season-long quest for intellectual and emotional freedom. He now dictates the rules of his own life.
  • True adulthood comes from questioning, understanding and embracing, not from doubt, prejudice and antagonism - in my view, this is the moral of the show.

Re: Favorite Quotes from 'The Blue Comet'

#43
asianguy63 wrote:this entire scene had me rolling the second time through.


[AJ getting dragged to the ground by Tony]

AJ: Owww..AhhhH! my telephone! *sobs*
Tony: Pack a bag...NOW!

[Aj's face...hillarious]


Tailbone. Why would he say "Ow, my telephone?"

RefLib wrote:Rewatching 85 tonight and for the first time notice that when Paulie and Tony are locking up the house, in the living room Paulie is set below a mantle with a decorative music stanza with musical notes on it, on the wall over the mantle.


Could anyone else look at that and play the music or recognize what the tune is by looking at it?

Has this been shown all through the series and I am just now noticing it?


It's been there since at least the second season. I remember seeing it in the background when they're taking family photos in both "D-Girl" and "Funhouse".

ngcazz wrote:Phil's observation that


to me is one of the most important moments in the whole series, because it epitomizes Tony's longstanding battle against Omertá.

By disparaging Tony's attitude towards Junior (and by extension, his own mother), Phil personifies Omertá itself. On the other hand, Tony represents self-understanding and intellectual honesty - or at least the fight for them. I believe Phil's spectacular death in the final episode is meant to signify that:
  • Tony finally succeeded in his six-season-long quest for intellectual and emotional freedom. He now dictates the rules of his own life.
  • True adulthood comes from questioning, understanding and embracing, not from doubt, prejudice and antagonism - in my view, this is the moral of the show.


Wow. No offense, but you actually think Tony is a BETTER person by the end of the series?

And to add my own, even though it's been mentioned before...

"There's no scraps in my scrapbook"

The look Butchie and Albie share when Phil says that is what kills me. And you gotta love Murmur showing up again with the newspaper.

"Hey, who does this look like?"
What violin?!

Re: Favorite Quotes from 'The Blue Comet'

#44
Pope Corky the IX wrote:Wow. No offense, but you actually think Tony is a BETTER person by the end of the series?


Damn, it's been quite a long time since I last came here :)

I take no offense at what you said, because nowhere in my post did I say Tony was a "better person" :) What I did say, though, was that he gained control over his life over the course of the seasons, after realizing his place in the world. It's inarguable he became a more ruthless and efficient criminal - obviously a "worse" person. But taking into account the overarching theme of self-discovery and moral ambiguity, Tony did grow up, didn't he?

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